Electric Daisy! Wildfox White Label, fall 2013

If Daisy of the Great Gatsby were a real girl in today's world , if she were a little Wildfox, this is how I imagine her... cropped colored hair, wild and romantic, fun and bright and vivacious! I cast and shot my wonderful friend and talented model, Alexandra Spencer, to portray the updated character. I was also really inspired by New York, I spent a lot of nights exploring the city and staying out until sunrise, I read the book "The Rules of Civility" and felt so connected to the characters, I love Silent movies and the idea of the 1920s circus! If those black and white pictures suddenly came to life it would be so fun, maybe they wore all kinds of crazy colors and sparkle!! Here is our imagined 20's girl come to life, I hope you love it! XOXOXO

Photos by: Kimerley Gordon

Make up: Carlene K

Wigs: Anna Lee Fiorino

Styling by Kimberley Gordon and Meredith Leyerzaph

Let's talk Pucci!

Even with heavy hitters such as Lindsey Wixson, Daphne Groenveld and Carmen Pedaru, Pucci still chose Sasha Luss to open his FW 13 show, this is a big and clear message that this model is finally getting her break. I can't wait to watch her rise!! I think the hair and beauty at the show is my favorite so far, rock and roll 70's bohemiam babes, leaving a show and heading to the after party... if this show doesn't make you want bangs I dont know what will.

 

 

Affordable comfortable re creation:

 

Thigh high Socks

Pastel Coat

Fun Tan Skirt

Tan T shirt

Black Boots

Patent leather Hat, vintage

Clip in Bangs

 

Giles Fall 2013, Died and gone to heaven.

 

 

February 18, 2013 LONDON
By Jo-Ann Furniss

As Kristen McMenamy emerged in the first look of Giles Deacon's show this evening—white hair flowing, eye makeup appearing almost bruised, expression somewhat askance, clothed in a long white silk organza dress, modest yet extravagant, somewhere between the bridal and the funeral shroud—it appeared it was time for an excursion in melancholia. And a somewhat Pre-Raphaelite one, for good measure. But it is never quite as simple as that with one of Giles Deacon's collections, and what we actually got was a cross between high art and pop culture, the up and the down, intense craftsmanship and throwaway punch lines.

If there was an abiding theme for this collection—and it is always difficult to pin the designer down—it was heaven and hell, with McMenamy leading a cast of fallen angels. The show venue was the venerable Stationers' Hall, dating back to the seventeenth century, standing in close proximity to Saint Paul's Cathedral. It was here that Deacon had gathered chief inspiration for the collection, in the form of Viscount Melbourne's monument, the doorway to which is meant to be a portal to heaven or to hell, depending on which side you enter. This collection walked through the middle and had something of both.

There was a heavy debt to the sculptor and wood-carver Grinling Gibbons—again, his work features heavily in Saint Paul's. That was particularly the case in the carefully crafted gold laser-cut leather pieces of baroque curling feathers. But there was equally a debt to the American grunge music scene of the early nineties. The downbeat mood, the purposeful repetition of floor-sweeping full-skirted silhouettes, and the slouchy knitted caps had as much to do with this as any English baroque meditation on death.

Still, the real guiding principle of this collection was its craftsmanship, and that is what grounds Deacon as a designer. "This takes time, all of this work," he said after the show. "The latticed leather bodices alone took two months to perfect and complete. It simply is not fast fashion; it is fashion that is flamboyant, specialist, creative, and can often be made to order. It really should stand apart in that way." And it did. Despite the professed influence of the TV show Blackadder, and setting jokes aside—which is hard for Deacon to do—he is a serious designer who can really make clothes. Theatrical maybe, but in terms of the man-hours involved, the handcrafted techniques, and the level of skill shown, nothing comes close to this in London this week.